The Garlic Garden-Blog
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close-up of young garlic field

Updates

In this area of our website you will be able to follow the progress of the garlic crop and keep up-to-date with other garlic related topics as they happen at The Garlic Garden.


July 22, 2017

Market Season!

photo of a bin full of garlic

Harvest hasn't officially began, however we decided to dig a few heads anyway so that we could attend the Regina Farmers Market on Saturday July 22, 2017.

No definite plans now as to when any future markets will be since we will be harvesting this coming week.

A schedule will be posted to show the dates of the Saskatoon and Regina Markets that we will be attending as soon as we know.

We will also have dehydrated products at the markets while supplies last.


June 22, 2017

Scape Season!

photo of a garlic scape

Garlic scapes are one of the most versatile foods to cook with. They can be chopped up and eaten raw in salads, smoothies, and eggs. They can be steamed like a bean, grilled on a barbecue, sauteed with all your meats or pickled to enjoy all winter long.

The garlic scape season only lasts ten to fourteen days as the scapes quickly mature past the point where they are nice and tender.

Anna will be attending three markets this year with garlic scapes. They are:

June 28th at the Regina Farmers Market

July 1st at the Saskatoon Farmers Market

July 5th at the Regina Farmers Market


June 9, 2017

Pasture Raised Pigs

photo of a pig

What goes good with garlic? How about pork? This seems to be a good fit on two levels. One is with the consumption of garlic and the other is with the production of garlic.

First on consumption. It is quite simple. Garlic sausage made from pasture raised pork and garlic from the Garlic Garden. What could be better than that!

Second on production. Over the last few years we have incorporated cover crops into our system in a big way. The reason is to improve the health of the soil. The next step is to incorporate livestock into the system to further improve the quality of the soil. A healthy soil means healthy garlic.

The pigs are being held in a portable building for now. They are still a bit small to be let out. They could end up being lunch for a coyote. Also the cover crops have just been planted so it will be a few weeks before they have grown enough for the pigs. For now the pigs will remain in the portable building and the building will be moved twice a day to fresh grass.

These guys will be ready to go in November. The plan is to come up with a premium quality garlic sausage. Anybody have any good sausage recipes?


October 16, 2016

Retail Outlets

photo of a family of geese

We understand it may not always be possible to attend markets or trade shows. For those that would rather purchase from a local retailer please check out the "Retailers" page on this website for a list of businesses that you may find more convenient.

It may be a good idea to check the "Retailers" page from time to time as it will be updated to include new retailers in the future.


December 16, 2015

Sprouted Garlic

photo of sprouted garlic

It has been a few months now since the last garlic harvest and it is possible that green shoots are beginning to grow on some bulbs. You may be wondering if sprouted garlic is safe or if it should be discarded.

It is well known that when seedlings begin to grow into green plants, they make many new compounds including some that protect the young plants from pathogens. This same process actually improves the plants nutrient composition. Studies have even concluded that certain sprouted plants have increased antioxidant activity.

A study funded by Korea's Institute of Planning and Evaluation for Technology which was recently published in the ACS' Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry set out to see if this applied to garlic.

The researchers found that garlic sprouted for five days had higher antioxidant activity than unsprouted garlic.

So yes, it is ok to eat sprouted garlic as long as the cloves haven't shrivelled and softened. In fact, it is actually better for you than unsprouted garlic. Some people find the flavour to be more bitter when it's cooked after having sprouted. If this is undesirable, the sprouts can easily be removed from the cloves prior to use.


Sunday December 7, 2014

Early Winter Update

photo of thermometer in snow

Snow cover has been our main method for protecting the garlic from our long cold winters. On occasion mother nature doesn't cooperate and the extreme cold arrives before the snow.

In an attempt to better understand the effects of snow cover on the garlic cloves, I have buried a thermometer sensor within a row of garlic at the same depth as the garlic (about 3.5 inches). Each day I take the thermometer display out to the field to get a temperature reading.

It is very obvious that even a few inches of snow will provide a great deal of protection. The lowest temperature observed below the surface so far was -3.6 C. That was on November 20 when the air temperature was -17.5 C and no snow was present. The coldest temperature observed since it snowed was -2.3 C. At that time there was about 4 inches of snow on the ground and the air temperature was -27.3 C. As the snow deepens the insulation value continues to increase. With 6 inches of snow the temperature below the soil surface has never fallen below -2 C while air temperature lows have continued to fall, at times to near -30 C.

We have had experience with winter kill in the past but have no idea as to how much cold the garlic cloves can tolerate. We do know that as long as there is a good snow cover it doesn't matter how cold the air temperature gets, winter kill is avoided.